Each week Collective IP highlights a particular profile, either a company, an investigator or technology transfer office. Today we shine the light upon the University California, Irvine.

UCIrvibe

 

Profile: https://www.collectiveip.com/technology-transfer/university-of-california-irvine

About

The UCI Office of Technology Alliances (OTA) exists to foster faculty/industry alliances and commercialization of UC Irvine technology for the broad public benefit. OTA emphasizes accessibility, timeliness, and flexibility in its operations and negotiations to ensure that the federal, state and private investment in UCI research has the greatest possible positive impact on people and the economy.

At the end of fiscal year 2013 OTA managed:

  • 938 inventions in its portfolio
  • 359 active US patents
  • 102 active license or option agreements

OTA has participated in founding more than 60 companies.

Is there a particular technology residing with your office/university you wish to highlight?

Researchers at UCI, in collaboration with colleagues at the Italian Institute of Technology in Italy, are developing novel small-molecule inhibitors of intracellular acid ceramidase activity. These compounds act at single digit nanomolar concentrations to sensitize tumor cells to current anticancer drugs and radiation therapy, increasing the potency of standard chemotherapies by 10-20 fold.

Novel Acid Ceramidase Inhibitors for Oncology and Neuropathic Pain
Tech ID: 24060 / UC Case 2013-225-0
Patent Status:  Patent Pending

Publications:

Is there a particular faculty/student-inventor you would like to highlight?

Dr. Payam Heydari is currently a Professor of Electrical Engineering at the University of California, Irvine. He is also an IEEE Distinguished Lecturer. He received his B.S. and M.S. degrees (Honors) in Electrical Engineering from Sharif University of Technology in 1992 and 1995, respectively. He received his Ph.D. degree from the University of Southern California in 2001.

His IEEE Lectures are:

  • Distributed Integrated Circuits for Broadband Communications
  • “Millimeter-wave and Terahertz Integrated Circuits in Silicon Technologies: Challenges and Solutions”
  • Millimeter-wave Imaging and Sensing in Silicon
  • Terahertz and Millimeter-Wave Frequency Generation and Synthesis in Silicon.

Are there any spin-out start-up companies or licensee relationships associated with your office/university you wish to draw attention to?

SRCH2 is a company based upon UCI technology. The company and their programs were recently featured in the UC technology commercialization 2013 University of California Technology Commercialization Report.

SRCH2 was founded by Stanford PhDs and ex-Googlers, based on a decade of award-winning and patented research, funded by data industry insiders and top tier venture firms, built to address the search needs of modern data-driven applications. SRCH2’s in-memory search engine provides high performance and high efficiency at massive scale in one framework.

Are there any unique programs associated with your office you wish to highlight?

UCI Irvine has an extensive social media platform, including apps in the Apple, Google, and Kindle stores, online blog, website, YouTube channel, Dropbox and other technologies. We understand the importance of leveraging our extensive portfolio and management techniques to expand our contacts and developments. We are currently expanding our research capabilities to include projects in defense offset collaborations, leveraging our extensive international research programs in this field. We anticipate expanding these relationships further over the next few years.

Do you have any comments you would like to share about the Collective IP platform, and our efforts to organize the Innovation Ecosystem, and bring academia and industry together faster and more efficiently than ever before?

We think the Collective IP platform is an excellent way to get the message out on patenting, research, and clinical trials and demonstrate the full extent of UCI’s work.  We have featured Collective IP in our app as a demonstration of our view of the effectiveness of the program.

UCI OTA Contacts:

Casie Kelly, Ph.D.
Senior Licensing Officer
UCI Office of Technology Alliances
949-824-2920
casie.kelly@research.uci.edu

The Collective IP Innovation Intelligence Digest is a hand-curated newsletter compiled weekly to illuminate those technologies and inventors who are driving the innovation economy. If you enjoy and find this aggregated information informative please consider forwarding it to your friends and colleagues. New readers can subscribe HERE. Thank you!

TTOs

Marshall University (@MarshallU) published their 2013-2014 research highlights, take a look at year chock full ‘o innovation, Here.

A new approach developed by Lawrence Berkeley National Labs’ (@techLBNL) materials science division could end up simplifying the process of uniformly applying nanoparticles across wafers, Here.

University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center (@UTSWNews) has launched a regional brain tissue collection program that will support research on this condition, which affects an estimated one in 68 children, Here.

Veterinary surgeons at the University of Georgia (@UGAResearch) Veterinary Teaching Hospital successfully performed a kidney transplant in a domestic cat and used stem cells harvested from the patient to optimize the cat’s acceptance of the new kidney, Here.

University of California, San Diego (@UCSDTTO) computer scientists have developed a tool that allows hardware designers and system builders to test security – this is a first for the field, Here.

Spin-outs, Start-ups & Funding

Yale University (@YaleOCR) biotech startup IsoPlexis received $100,000 from the YEI Innovation Fund. The Company is developing a single cell immunoassay and software that provides in-depth understanding of immune and cancer cells, Here.

Northwestern University (@INVOatNU) start-up EarMachine (@earmachine) was named one of the most exciting tech music newco’s in Chicago by ChicagoInno (@ChicagoInno), Here.

University of Kansas (@KU_IC) start-up KanPro Research, Inc., a contract research organization that produces challenging proteins for university and corporate researchers in the life sciences, biotechnology and medicine, is the Jayhawks 25th newco to launch, Here.

Cambridge University (@ImperialTTO) start-up Featurespace raised ~$5MM. The Company developed a behavior analytics engine based on Bayesian statistics, Here.

University of New Mexico (@STCUNM) start-up Bandojo (@bandojomusic) has developed software that enables a user who has not had any musical training to make music, Here.

Events

Are you attending the 2014 BIO International Convention next week? If so, be certain to stop by booth #5611 and visit with us Collective IP (@CollectiveIP), global leaders in Innovation Intelligence. We will have some exciting news to share with you in San Diego!

The BioFrontiers Institute (@BioFrontiers) will be moderating a most intriguing panel featuring participants from @Pfizer, @BroadInstitute and @Stanford at #BIO2014: Designing Academic-Industrial Partnerships to Accelerate Product Development.

The NYU Entrepreneurial Institute (@NYUEntrepreneur) will be hosting its next Startup Bootcamp for NYU Scientists & Engineers on Monday, June 30th at NYU Langone Medical Center. Register Here.

Don’t miss Boston University’s Office of Technology Development (@OTDatBU) 5th annual Tech, Drugs and Rock n’ Roll networking event, Tuesday July 15th, celebrating the intersection of business and science communities. Register Here.

A few days ago the Patent Docs blog posted a thoughtful response to Tesla’s patent announcement, and it is well worth reading the entire thing.

One point, made concisely and somewhat in passing in that blog post, we thought deserved a spotlight:

“It is not uncommon for holders of a proprietary technology to share it with competitors in order to grow a market.  Many standards bodies exist for such a purpose, and require that participants license their standards-essential patents on a fair and non-discriminatory basis.”

The electric vehicle industry, and in particular the electric vehicle battery sub-category, like many nascent industries before it, benefits from industry-wide standards to ensure interoperability and encourage investment in a reliable supplier ecosystem. There is a long history of formal standards setting bodies adopting industry standards and obtaining pledges from patentees to contribute their patented technology to the standard. The patentees, in exchange for getting their technology broadly adopted and the growth of their industry supercharged, agree to license their standard essential patents (“SEP”s) on fair, reasonable and non-discriminatory (“FRAND”) terms.

Perhaps Tesla’s patent move can be viewed in this light: a SEP/FRAND overture, but without going through a formal standard setting body. Elon Musk may be saying, to both competitors and potential new market entrants into the electric vehicle supply chain: adopt my technology and we will license the technology to you on FRAND terms (or maybe even “open source” or free terms) and won’t sue you so long as you “act in good faith”. Which is of course exactly how it would play out if Tesla contributed patents to an official electric vehicle components standards setting body. Elon’s genius was in doing this move in such a way as to maximize publicity and good feeling, but without having to deal with the legal and negotiation annoyances of an actual standards setting body.

It is worth remembering that patents serve a wide array of purposes, and sometimes “giving them away” (even if that’s not really what is happening) is among the savviest moves a business like Tesla, or in circumstances similar to Tesla’s, can make. Of course one must obtain the patents in the first place, and in this regard Tesla is not about to stop, or even slow down.

Tesla Patent Wall

The (former) wall of patents at Tesla

 

Each week Collective IP highlights a particular profile, either a company, an investigator or technology transfer office. Today we shine the light upon the Argonne National Laboratory:

ANL_H_White

 

Profile: https://www.collectiveip.com/technology-transfer/argonne-national-lab

About

With a FY13 budget of $722MM, Argonne is a multidisciplinary science and engineering research center, where world-class researchers work alongside experts from industry, academia and other government laboratories to address vital national challenges in clean energy, environment, technology and national security. Surrounded by the highest concentration of top-tier research organizations in the world, Argonne leverages its Chicago-area location to lead discovery and to power innovation in a wide range of core scientific capabilities, from high-energy physics and materials science to structural biology and advanced computer science. The Argonne research agenda spans 15 scientific divisions, 14 centers, and six national user facilities. Argonne is managed by UChicago Argonne, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Science.

Profile Spotlight Interview Questions:

Is there a particular technology residing with your office/university you wish to highlight?

Argonne National Laboratory has designed a Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) DC charging system, adding 60-80 miles of range to an Electric Vehicle (EV) in less than 20 minutes.

One of the major drawbacks of electric vehicles (EVs) is the long period of time required to recharge EV batteries. While regular Alternating Current (AC) charging systems are sufficient for overnight charging of these vehicles at home or at the office, they aren’t practical for quick recharging in public areas. A rapid means for recharging EVs is needed in order to make electric vehicles a practical alternative to traditional internal combustion engine-powered vehicles.

In response to this need, Argonne National Laboratory has developed a Direct Current (DC) Charging Digital Communication Controller, or “SpEC” (Smartgrid Ev Communication) module. DC fast charging enables rapid recharging of electric vehicles along heavy traffic corridors and at public stations. A DC fast charge can add 60 to 80 miles of range to an EV in less than 20 minutes.  The SAE defines the specifications and requirements for off-board DC charging of electric vehicles; Argonne National Laboratory’s SpEC module conforms to these SAE standards.

View video of Argonne SpEC Module here.

Is there a particular faculty/student-inventor you would like to highlight?

Ann Schlenker is the Director of Argonne’s Center for Transportation Research. In this role, she leads a team of scientists and engineers conducting research and developing technologies with the goal of reducing the transportation sector’s reliance on petroleum and imported oil. Schlenker oversees engineering research to improve engine fuel efficiency and combustion processes, reduce friction losses, evaluate powertrain and vehicle architectures in virtual and experimental contexts and validate interoperability with the smart grid. She also oversees the Department of Energy’s Advanced Vehicle Technology Competitions for education of the next generation of automotive engineers. Prior to joining Argonne in 2009, Schlenker worked for Chrysler for more than 30 years, most recently as Director of Advanced Vehicle Engineering and Alliances.

Are there any spin-out start-up companies or licensee relationships associated with your office/university you wish to draw attention to?

Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Argonne National Laboratory working with FMC Corporation (NYSE:FMC), have developed novel materials that would help expand technology and product development by industries using the company’s unique Stabilized Lithium Metal Powder (SLMP®).

 “Our fundamental research on the SLMP technology and development of new methods to apply the lithium metal product into high-energy Li-ion batteries for electric vehicles is an example of how national laboratories can aid U.S. companies to increase their competitive advantage in the global marketplace,” said Argonne chemist John Zhang. “As a researcher, it’s very satisfying to see the impact your innovations have on industry.”

The researchers, led by Zhang, discovered how to overcome technical challenges that hindered use of SLMP in commercial applications by devising a way to incorporate a safe form of the lithium powder into any type of Li-ion battery, including those used for electric vehicles, enabling greater energy density, extended cycle-life and reduced manufacturing costs. Non-stabilized lithium powder is unstable when exposed to air. FMC’s SLMP is coated with a protective layer to stabilize the lithium. As a result, the stabilized lithium is safe to handle in the dry room environment. SLMP is not compatible with conventional binder and solvent slurry materials. This led Zhang’s team to develop a novel polymer binder and solvent system, which demonstrated excellent compatibility with SLMP, thus enabling SLMP for slurry processing. The innovative new polymer binder/solvent system allows the SLMP to be evenly distributed in the electrode, enabling optimum use of each lithium particle in the SLMP material. Argonne researchers also developed new methods to activate the SLMP. Compression of the electrode laminates is typically employed to activate SLMP particles. The battery manufacturing cost can be greatly reduced due to the simplified SLMP activation method developed by Argonne.

FMC recently awarded Zhang and his colleagues – Khalil Amine, Shengwen Yuan, Zheng Xue and Jung-Je Woo – its prestigious Scientific Achievement Award for their significant research and development efforts. Argonne has patents pending on the polymer binder and solvent technologies, as well as the activation method. This project is part of the Integrated Laboratories and Industry Research Program, which is supported by the Energy Department’s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

Are there any unique programs associated with your office you wish to highlight?

Located at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Argonne National Laboratory, the Joint Center for Energy Storage Research (JCESR) is a major research partnership that integrates government, academic, and industrial researchers from many disciplines to overcome critical scientific and technical barriers and create new breakthrough energy storage technology. Partners include national leaders in science and engineering from academia, industry, and national laboratories. Their combined expertise spans the full range of the technology-development pipeline from basic research to prototype development to product engineering to market delivery. JCESR will make rapid progress and meaningful advances by strengthening these links. JCSER academic partners will contribute world-leading expertise in energy policy, economics, and market analysis.

 

The Collective IP Innovation Intelligence Digest is a hand-curated newsletter compiled weekly to illuminate those technologies and inventors who are driving the innovation economy. If you enjoy and find this aggregated information informative please consider forwarding it to your friends and colleagues. New readers can subscribe HERE. Thank you!

TTOs

University of Georgia (@UGAResearch) assistant engineering professor Jenna Jambeck who in collaboration with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (@NOAA), created the “Marine Debris Tracker” app for iPhone, was named at Apple’s Worldwide Developers Conference as an ‘App We Can’t Live Without’. Here.

This is what science looks like at North Carolina State University (@NCStateResearch), associate professor of electrical and computer engineering, Cranos Williams, is developing computational models to understand the biological processes that impact plant growth. Here.

A new compound developed by Philip Portoghese, Ph.D., of the University of Minnesota’s (@UMNresearch) College of Pharmacy shows promise as a breakthrough drug for treating chronic pain, and appears to be the first of its kind. Here.

Texas Tech University (@InnovateTxTech) doctoral candidate Brandon Sweeney is working to improve the strength of 3D printed parts by incorporating carbon nanotubes in plastic printer filaments and exposing printed parts to microwave energy. Here.

Professor George Nolas, Ph.D. from the University of South Florida (@USFResearch) Department of Physics was awarded the Barbara P. and Emery H. Jewell Award for Physics Faculty Excellence in thermoelectrics and clathrates. Here.

Spin-out Start-ups & Funding

University of Michigan (@UMOTT) start-up Rubicon Genomics (@RubiconGenomics) announced that it signed agreements with seven distributors in Europe to expand the availability of its leading DNA library preparation products. Here.

Cornell University (@CU_TechTransfer) start-up, MetaStat, a life science company focused on commercializing novel technologies that uniquely understand systemic metastasis, announced positive results from a study of its MetaSite Breast test in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute (@JNCI_Now). Here.

University of Florida (@UFOTL) start-up, Altavian (@AltavianInc), a drone manufacturer, reached a funding agreement with the Institute for the Commercialization of Public Research (@FL_Institute). Here.

UT Southwestern Medical Center (@UTSWNews) and the University Medical Center Health System in Lubbock, Texas, have forged a new partnership in kidney transplantation that provides the most advanced patient care, while enabling patients to prepare for and recover from surgery close to home. Here.

University Illinois Labs (@UILabs), new digital manufacturing labs, received $10MM in defense funds to speed the development of military vehicles. Here.

Events

The University of North Dakota (@UND_IP_COMM) announces 2014 Dakota Conference on Rural and Public Health, taking place June 18–20 in Grand Forks. The Dakota Conference provides an opportunity for over 300 health care professionals, educators, and students to share strategies for building and sustaining healthy communities in North Dakota. Register Here.

The NYU Entrepreneurial Institute (@NYUEntrepreneur) will be hosting its next Startup Bootcamp for NYU Scientists & Engineers on Monday, June 30th at NYU Langone Medical Center. Register Here.

The University of Washington (@uwc4c) announced a deadline of July 30 for the social venture partners fast pitch business plan competition. Register Here.

Don’t miss Boston University’s Office of Technology Development (@OTDatBU) 5th annual Tech, Drugs and Rock n’ Roll networking event, Tuesday July 15th, celebrating the intersection of business and science communities. Register Here.

There has been a lot of excitement over the announcement that a leading tech incubator — Y Combinator — is moving into the life sciences. We think this is great news and agree with the various plaudits for the move. There has also been criticism, as well as take-down of that criticism, both are conveniently found in this article by well known life science investor Bruce Booth, Here.

What has been overlooked in the discussion of capital needs and timelines of tech versus life science investing, however, is the single most critical distinction between the two: in life science companies patents are *mandatory* — there is simply no way to proceed without them. With tech startups, in contrast, patents are optional, and indeed many tech investors are decidedly anti patent (or at least anti software patent). A call for the abolishment of software patents can be found in this article by well known tech investor Brad Feld, Here

With the rise of ‘virtual’ biotechs, as pointed out in the articles in support of Y-Combinator’s move, it has become easier for some select life science innovations to get to a proof-of-concept stage in a shorter period of time and with fewer financial resources than was typically the case since the advent of the biotechnology business. This is becoming true for certain medtech and medical device technologies as well.

Accordingly, other tech accelerators may follow Y Combinator in reaching out to the life sciences. We think this is an excellent development for scientific and economic advancement, but it is important that all of these new entrants to the life science entrepreneurial space understand that patents are an indispensable component to the bioscience business model, and core to the entire venture.

Without both defensible core patents and freedom-to-operate, there can be no biotechnology company. Intellectual property strategy then is mandatory and a key distinction between tech and life science companies. As tech investors expand their investment theses to include life science bets, understanding the patent strategy of accelerator applicants must be a required component of their screening and diligence process. If exhaustively executed, these efforts will undoubtedly aid in improving the opportunities for success. Once this distinction is woven into the new life science investor’s DNA we see a bright future for tech incubators and accelerators moving into the life sciences.

¹ It should be noted that many large tech companies that were once considered anti-patent have become, in recent years, significant patent holders. See, e.g. Google, Here.

 

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Each week Collective IP highlights a particular profile, either a company, an investigator or technology transfer office. Today we shine the light upon the Vanderbilt University:

Vandy

 

Profile: https://www.collectiveip.com/technology-transfer/vanderbilt-university

About

Founded in 1873, Vanderbilt University is an internationally recognized research university in Nashville, Tenn., with strong partnerships among its 10 schools, neighboring institutions and the community.

Vanderbilt’s Center for Technology Transfer and Communication (CTTC) experienced and outstanding 2013 for licenses executed, revenue generated, inventions evaluated, and materials transfer and confidentiality agreements executed. In addition to the $24MM in new revenues generated, more than $5MM in corporate sponsored research was received specifically to further develop licensed Vanderbilt technologies.

Profile Spotlight Interview Questions:

Is there a particular technology residing with your office/university you wish to highlight?

Vanderbilt CTTC recently launched MTAShare, an automated platform for managing and processing material transfer agreements (MTAs). The system is currently being used for all outbound MTAs with not-for-profit research institutions. Early in fiscal year 2015, CTTC will release the system for use by other not-for-profit research institutions. The system is designed to significantly speed the transfer of research materials, reduce administrative burden and costs, eliminate unnecessary review and negotiation, empower researchers, and manage export control issues. More.

Is there a particular faculty/student-inventor you would like to highlight?

Under the direction of Michael Goldfarb, Ph.D., Vanderbilt University’s Center for Intelligent Mechatronics (CIM) has created a portfolio of rehabilitation robotics.  Current projects include a powered, multi-degree-of-freedom prosthetic arm, a powered exoskeleton for gait restoration in spinal-cord injured victims and stroke rehabilitations, and a powered transfemoral prosthesis that enhances mobility and reduces falls for lower-limb amputees. Read more in: Vanderbilt’s Medical Device Pipeline.

Are there any spin-out start-up companies or licensee relationships associated with your office/university you wish to draw attention to?

In 2009, Vanderbilt recruited Dr. Stephen Fesik, divisional VP for Cancer Research at Abbott Laboratories, to lead a new cancer drug development effort with goals analogous to those of our already successful program in the neurosciences. In his short time here, Dr. Fesik has grown his research endeavor to more than 28 full time faculty and staff, employing a fragment-based approach to identify novel, potent cancer therapeutics. He has already been awarded a Pioneer Award from the National Institutes of Health for $2.5 million to support his cancer drug discovery efforts and has been approached by several pharmaceutical companies to begin discussions for partnerships. Read more in: Vanderbilt’s Small Molecule & Companion Diagnostics Pipeline.

Are there any unique programs associated with your office you wish to highlight?

InvisionHeart, LLC is an early-stage company based on a mobile, 12-lead ECG system developed by Vanderbilt researchers. Led by CEO Josh Nickols, InvisionHeart completed JumpStart Foundry’s accelerator program in 2013. It was selected as one of 10 startups across the country to participate in Google for Entrepreneur’s Demo Day through which it received a $100,000 equity investment from AOL Founder Steve Case. That investment – along with recent investments by TriStar Technology Ventures, Mountain Group Capital and NeuCura Partners – helped InvisionHeart complete its $1.25MM Series A funding round. InvisionHeart will use the funding to finalize the technology design, seek clearance from the Food and Drug Administration, and begin sales.

The Collective IP Innovation Intelligence Digest is a hand-curated newsletter compiled weekly to illuminate those technologies and inventors who are driving the innovation economy. If you enjoy and find this aggregated information informative please consider forwarding it to your friends and colleagues. New readers can subscribe HERE. Thank you!

TTOs

A recent publication in Nature from researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine (@UCSDTTO) demonstrated the ability to erase and reactivate memories in rats, profoundly altering the animals’ reaction to past events. Here.

Researchers at the University of Georgia (@UGAResearch) are making their unique materials, reagents and tools ubiquitously through a new master licensing agreement between the UGA Research Foundation and KeraFAST. Here.

Researchers at the University of Arizona (@ArizonaTTA) now have a world-class supercomputing system to help them unlock the secrets of the universe. “El Gato” –  Extremely LarGe AdvancedTechnOlogy system – was acquired via a $1.3MM USF grant. Here.

Researchers at Florida Atlantic University’s (@FAUDivRes) Southeast National Marine Renewable Energy Center are installing the world’s first offshore test berth for small-scale ocean current turbines via a five-year lease agreement between FAU and the U.S. Department of the Interior’s Bureau of Ocean Energy Management. Here.

What is the best way to wash microbes from your produce? Food science researchers at North Carolina State University (@NCStateResearch) chime in on how. Here.

Spin-out Start-ups & Funding

Legal Science Partners, a spin-out from Temple University (@TUInnovations) is positioning itself as an “iTunes of Legal Research” by enabling search tools to illuminate how state laws have changed over time. Here.

Arizona State University (@ASUReport) start-up company Viomics has received $250,000 from the Arizona Commerce Authority to continue developing cancer detection technologies. And Provista Diagnostics, expanded its exclusive license agreement for certain biomarker and autoantibody technologies identified by researchers at the Biodesign Institute of Arizona State University. Here and Here.

Genia Technologies announced that the company, as part of a research consortium with Columbia University (@Columbia_Tech) and Harvard Medical School (@HarvardTechXfer), was acquired by Roche for approximately $350MM. Here.

Kite Pharma, a UCLA (@UCLAInvents) spin-out focused on developing engineered autologous T cell therapy products for the treatment of cancer, filed a registration statement on Form S-1 with an intent for a public offering. And UCLA spin-out ImaginAb raised $21MM to advance their antibody-re-engineering platform. Here and Here.

U.S. Senator Michael Bennet announced that Colorado State University (@CSUVentures) has won a $499,627 grant from the National Institute of Food and Agriculture’s Agriculture and Food Research Initiative Foundational Entrepreneurship, Technology, and Innovation program, the funds are allocated for Place Based Innovation: An Integrated Look at Agritourism in the Western U.S.. Here.

Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (@ScrippsResearch) received a grant of approximately $13MM from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease of the National Institutes of Health to study antibodies to the human immunodeficiency virus. Here.

InvisionHeart (@InvisionHeart), a Vanderbilt (@VanderbiltCTTC) spin-out developing a wireless electrocardiogram system to first responders and health care providers, closed $1.9MM  Series A financing. Participants in the round include The Martin Companies, TriStar Technology Ventures, Mountain Group Capital and NueCura Partners. Here.

Events

The NYU Entrepreneurial Institute (@NYUEntrepreneur) will be hosting its next Startup Bootcamp for NYU Scientists & Engineers on Monday, June 30th at NYU Langone Medical Center. Register Here.

Don’t miss Boston University’s Office of Technology Development (@OTDatBU) 5th annual Tech, Drugs and Rock n’ Roll networking event, Tuesday July 15th, celebrating the intersection of business and science communities. Register Here.

 

 Have some exciting news to share? Please let us know. Email us at info@collectiveip.com

A slew of recent articles are pointing to data and suggesting that America is losing its entrepreneurial edge, and that American entrepreneurship is slowly dying.

Is it possible that these statistics partly reflect the rise of a new independent workforce – people working singly or in ad-hoc temporary groupings – to solve problems that once required the formation of a new stand-alone business? Perhaps these statistics somehow reflect the impact of extraordinary productivity gains over the past few decades, driven chiefly by technology?

Taking the big picture argument as true, we believe there is a solution: more and better technology transfer.

American research institutions are second-to-none in breakthrough science and technical discovery. But where we sometimes fall down is in the complex process of technology commercialization. As FDA’s Janet Woodcock reportedly stated recently, “[We have an] explosion in basic sciences, but translational infrastructure is stuck in the 1980s.”

US Decline in Entrepreneurship

“Businesses less than a year old accounted for only about 8% of all US firms in 2011,
down from nearly 15% in 1978.”

In other words we are struggling to commercialize what we invent.

The complexity of the commercialization process is considerable.

Why should this be so?

Is it because investors are often wary of the technology transfer process? Is it because able graduate students and postdocs do not feel comfortable following an entrepreneurial path, or are ill-prepared for the task? Is it because patents can be difficult to uncover, analyze and value? Is it because the identification of emerging technologies is time consuming and expensive to surface?

All of these problems are solvable.

Stay tuned as Collective IP breaks down each of these complex processes and offers actionable solutions to a problem we all should be concerned about.

 

Each week Collective IP highlights a particular profile, either a company, investigator or technology transfer office. Today we shine the light upon the University of Colorado:

Screen Shot 2014-06-02 at 10.54.22 AM

Profile: University Colorado Technology Transfer Office

Founded in Boulder in 1876, the University of Colorado has developed into a premier teaching and research university. With nearly 58,000 students, over 4,700 full-time instructional faculty members and an additional 1,200 research faculty members across four campuses, CU is the largest institution of higher education in the state of Colorado. CU research faculty secured over $774MM in sponsored research funding in fiscal year 2012-13. This year eight new startups were added to CU’s portfolio, and CU’s startups as a group raised of $200MM in follow-on financing in FY 2012-13; the total follow-on funding raised by these companies is in excess of $6.1 billion (private capital, grants, M&A and IPOs). The most recent annual report may be viewed here.

Is there a particular technology residing with your office/university you wish to highlight?

  • Neurosurgeons at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus are working to refine a prototype of a cerebral shunt product for the treatment of hydrocephalus.  The shunt is designed to address the primary causes of shunt failure (70% failure rate) and complications with shunt replacement that affect most cases.  see attached

Is there a particular faculty/student-inventor you would like to highlight?

  • Work of Professor Tor Wager at the University of Colorado capitalizes on recent breakthroughs in measuring human brain activity using Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Wager’s group has developed a brain marker for acute pain based on moment-by-moment measures of fMRI activity across the brain, a marker they have termed the Neurologic Pain Signature (NPS).  The NPS provides an objective measure of acute pain intensity with high sensitivity and specificity (90-100%) for pain in individual patients, based on a one-hour fMRI session.  Potential Applications include:  Clinical trials, including drug efficacy testing and patient screening; Personalized Medicine; Legal applications; and Insurance applications.
  • Jay Hesselberth’s laboratory is doing work at the interface of computational biology, biochemistry, and optics, enabling on-chip protein sequencing technology with 10,000X throughput relative to traditional Edman degradation. The Bowman Research Group is based at the University of Colorado at Boulder and directed by Christopher N. Bowman, James & Catherine Patten Professor at the Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering. The  general research thrust of the group is the investigation of the formation, structure and properties of crosslinked polymeric materials, particularly those formed from photopolymerization reactions. Specifically, the group focuses on developing new materials and photopolymerization mechanisms for a variety of applications including: Photopolymerized Biomaterials, Biodetection Using Photopolymer Bioamplification, Microfluidic Photopolymerized Devices, Thiol-ene Systems for Dental Applications, Covalent Adaptable Networks, and Novel Photopolymers Exhibiting Unique Properties

Are there any spin-out start-up companies or licensee relationships associated with your office/university you wish to draw attention to?

Clear Creek

Clear Creek Networks is a software company that delivers a unique technology for electric utilities. As the first company to provide a fully-automated data network management solution Clear Creek Networks addresses the technical challenges and government regulations (such as the NERC CIPs) of the energy industry. Their intelligent network control software provides the next-generation foundation of data network demanded by SmartGrid technologies. SmartGrid promises such as increased integration of renewable energy, distributed energy resources, microgrids, demand response and cyber security will be difficult, if not impossible, to realize without an automated network. Clear Creek Networks is among the 2% top companies chosen worldwide for the SURGE accelerator – the #1 accelerator in the world for energy startups.

Are there any unique programs associated with your office you wish to highlight?

University of Colorado researchers are eligible for awards of $50,000 to $200,000 for commercial proof-of-concept (POC) work; eligible fields include bioscience, information technology, energy, infrastructure engineering, advanced manufacturing, electronics and aerospace.  The Technology Transfer Office also provides access to commercialization resources such as seed funding through the Colorado Institute for Drug, Device and Diagnostic Development and business advice through the Innovation Center of the Rockies.

Do you have any comments you would like to share about the Collective IP platform, and our efforts to organize the Innovation Ecosystem, and bring academia and industry together faster and more efficiently than ever before?

We are hopeful that Collective IP becomes the portal of choice for industry seeking collaborations with academic scientists.  We believe the real time information on new research funding, publications and patent applications provides the best picture of a lab’s real capabilities.

Interested in having your inventor, company or TTO profile highlighted in the spotlight? Simply claim your profile and let us know! info@collectiveip.com